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We all spend so much time on our mobile devices every day. Our favourite apps are a part of all of our daily routines. We use a number of apps regularly because they are easily accessible in so many of our devices; apps like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or WhatsApp, to name a few. We use these apps to connect to the world and the people around us.

Usually, when there is an update with significant changes, there is a split opinion on whether the update has improved the app’s functionality, or made it worse. Changes range from new or improved logos to changes to the app’s UI/UX- new icons or changes to the colour pallet included. As a user, you will either love the updates or hate them; reasonable to understand when one of your favourite apps changes what you’re used to. There are, of course, small changes that are rolled out regularly, which users don’t often notice.

Last year, one of the biggest updates in terms of user reaction took the form of the new Google logo. The updated UI created uproar from a variety of users; it was a huge change when the logo we all have known for so long disappeared, and we were met with a new logo. The fresh-look UI created a dissension among users; there were those who loved the new logo, and die-hard fans who wanted the old logo back.

The latest update creating disagreements is courtesy of Instagram. Released a few weeks ago, this update was met with mixed emotions. It included a new logo and a refined UI; UI changes include redesigned icons and an overhauled colour pallet, bringing the app closer to the look of its desktop counterpart.

At the end of the day, your opinion about the Google logo change, or the Instagram update, is not going to force Google or Instagram to revert back to their older UIs.

What I’m saying is that change is a good thing, but it takes time for users to get used to the improvements and differing looks of their favourite apps. Instagram ‘s latest update is here to stay, and users have grown used to the new features. Don’t get too attached, because the next big update is around the corner. I’ll bet you can barely remember the older versions anyway, right?

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